Turning Down The Gas

Low-FODMAP recipes.

These are fermentable carbohydrates found naturally in vegetables, fruit, grains, nuts, seeds, dairy food, as well as some additives, that for some people are a pain in the gut. Cauliflower, onions, garlic, apricots, chickpeas and yoghurt are just a few of the otherwise healthy foods that can cause problems for some sensitive people. These foods all contain types of carbs that we don’t digest and when they arrive in the large bowel undigested they ferment and create gas. “When there’s a lot of gas it puts pressure on the gut and the nerve endings of the bowel and this can make the brain overreact and register pain.” For most of us this is a non-event, but for the 15 per cent of people with IBS this gas can trigger bloating, discomfort and pain pain that’s occasionally bad enough to send people dashing to Accident and Emergency, says dietitian Dr Sue Shepherd of La Trobe University’s Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition who first identified these carbs as culprits in IBS. Low-FODMAP recipes. These fermentable carbohydrates can also change how quickly the bowel works – in susceptible people they can lead to constipation and diarrhoea or a combination of both,” she says. The trick to taming these symptoms is having fewer fermentable carbohydrates in the diet research at both Monash University and London’s Kings College Hospital has found that this works for around 75 per cent of people with IBS. While a low FODMAP diet puts some healthy fibre-rich foods off limits, it doesn’t mean sacrificing fibre, says Shepherd, the author of Low FODMAP Recipes, a new cookbook to help people with IBS make meals that minimise the gassy effects of FODMAPS. Although wheat, rye, barley and many vegetables including peas and mushrooms can cause problems, there’s still brown rice, quinoa, oats and buckwheat, as well as plenty of other vegetables. Spelt, a form of wheat, is also a problem but some breads made with spelt flour (Ancient Grains and Healthybake, for instance) are low in FODMAPs. This is because fructans – one of these indigestible carbs – gets broken down in the manufacturing process, she adds. Low FODMAP eating can be harder on vegans for whom high FODMAP beans and lentils are a good source of protein, iron and zinc. “But you don’t have to cut legumes out entirely everyone with IBS has a different threshold of how much fermentation their gut can handle before the nerve endings start screaming,” says Shepherd. The trick is to be scrupulous about avoiding other high FODMAP foods so you can tolerate some legumes.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome Is A Very Common Problem

Dietary changes can be helpful. However, no specific diet can be recommended for IBS because the condition differs from one person to another. Changes that may help alleviate symptoms include avoiding large meals and foods and drinks that stimulate the intestines, such as, caffeine, tea or colas. This is the most important take-away message: if you notice a consistent change in bowel habits, consult your primary care physician. Learn more about this topic by attending the repeat presentation of Calm Your Colon: IBS, Crohns and Colitis with Dr. Jefrey Salek and Dr. Shirani Sood, gastroenterologists at Norwich GI Associates, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5 at Backus Hospital. Call (860) 889-8331, ext. 6381 to register. Call now to reserve your space at this program its filling up fast! Alice Facente, RN, is a Backus Health System community health nurse. This advice should not replace the advice of your personal healthcare provider.

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Peppermint May Soothe Irritable Bowel Syndrome

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This is potentially the first step in determining a new type of mainstream clinical treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS),” says Dr Stuart Brierley . Scientists in Australia at the University of Adelaide’s Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory say peppermint has been commonly prescribed by naturopaths for many years, there has been no clinical evidence until now to demonstrate why it is so effective in relieving pain. IBS is one of the most common disorders diagnosed by doctors. It begins before the age of 35 in about 50 percent of people. “This is a debilitating condition and affects many people on a daily basis, particularly women who are twice as likely to experience Irritable Bowel Syndrome,” Brierley adds. There is no cure for IBS and it often comes and goes over a person’s lifetime. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases here in the US says there is no specific test for IBS, however many doctors may run tests to be sure you don’t have other diseases. These tests include stool sampling tests, blood tests, x-rays and a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy . Most people diagnosed with IBS control their symptoms with diet, stress management and medicine. A high-fiber die t was once thought to be the best diet for almost everyone with IBS, but recent studies show that isnt true for everyone. Foods such as beans, cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, peas, onions, and bagels, that can cause minor discomfort in a normal GI tract can cause significant bloating, gas, and abdominal pain in IBS sufferers.

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New ‘fodmap’ Diet Finds Relief For Those With Sensitive Stomachs

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FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. Well, perhaps that definition doesn’t clarify things much. That name contains a list of indigestible sugars that are found in many foods. Some people will experience IBS symptoms from these foods because their guts are sensitive to them. Many foods that should be avoided or reduced in a low FODMAP diet are certain fruits, sweeteners, grains, vegetables and milk products. According to Emedicine.net, a diet low in FODMAPs can bring some relief to many people who have irritable bowel syndrome reducing symptoms. The diet is not considered a cure but it can ease the pain, gas, bloating and other IBS symptoms. If you’ve been seen by a doctor and have been found not to have other conditions such as celiac disease, ovarian cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, you might want to consider a low FODMAP diet. ___________________________________________________ Not All Organic Products are Created Healthy ___________________________________________________ These carbohydrates ferment in the digestive process because they’re not broken down sufficiently or absorbed in the small intestine. They then remain in an undigested state as they move through the bowel. Colonic bacteria ferment.

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FODMAP diet gives woman direction

I finally found a Quaker rice cake with chips,” she said. Only the kettle corn variety of rice cakes met the criteria for the diet. Because of her IBS combined with her hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Ms. Arnold has learned that she must eat throughout the day. Though she always used to eat three square meals a day, she now has breakfast followed by a snack or two, then lunch followed by a snack or two, then dinner followed by a snack (this schedule is only recommended for people with both IBS and hypoglycemia). Rice now forms a large part of her diet, along with wild rice, and especially potatoes (her dietitian told her, “potatoes in all forms are your friends”). She can have hard cheeses and zucchini and green beans and strawberries. And she found a chicken broth, but just one, that is not made with ingredients that make her feel bad. “It’s a matter of reading all the stupid labels all the time. There is so much crud in our food. It made me very, very aware that there are so many things that they put in our food,” she said. So far, the ingredients that have been hardest to give up have been onions and garlic. Seasoning food can be a challenge for her now, but she has learned she can eat the green parts of green onions and cilantro and, for some reason, garlic-infused olive oil. “Herbs are something I can experiment with. This has opened up a whole way of looking at food for me,” she said, noting that she always used to strictly follow published recipes but now she has to make her own.

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Low Fodmap Diet: What Is It And What Does It Do?

Beating IBS – could the FODMAP diet be the answer?

FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols. Well, perhaps that definition doesn’t clarify things much. That name contains a list of indigestible sugars that are found in many foods. Some people will experience IBS symptoms from these foods because their guts are sensitive to them. This Article Vote Saved My Life Many foods that should be avoided or reduced in a low FODMAP diet are certain fruits, sweeteners, grains, vegetables and milk products. According to Emedicine.net, a diet low in FODMAPs can bring some relief to many people who have irritable bowel syndrome reducing symptoms. The diet is not considered a cure but it can ease the pain, gas, bloating and other IBS symptoms. If you’ve been seen by a doctor and have been found not to have other conditions such as celiac disease, ovarian cancer and inflammatory bowel disease, you might want to consider a low FODMAP diet. These carbohydrates ferment in the digestive process because they’re not broken down sufficiently or absorbed in the small intestine. They then remain in an undigested state as they move through the bowel. Colonic bacteria ferment.

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This NHS-approved programme is gaining in popularity, but changes some of our thinking on what ‘good’ foods for us are. Because of this it’s recommended you only start the diet with the help of a dietician or your GP. [The facts about IBS] Dr Gill Hart, Scientific Director at YorkTest Laboratories, which specialises in food intolerance testing and has created a new diet programme specifically to combat IBS explains: “IBS varies hugely between individuals so it’s never a case of one diet fits all, which is why it’s really important to be supervised if you decide to remove FODMAP foods from your diet.” “In trials we’ve run at YorkTest, we saw a significant improvement in symptoms in patients who stuck to their prescribed diet. “Many people with IBS just aren’t aware that with a little help, they can often find simple dietary solutions to ease their symptoms.” Though packed with nutrients, broccoli can cause problems for IBS patients [REX] What is FODMAP? Standing for the rather complicated Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols, FODMAP foods contain types of carbohydrate and sugars that are not successfully broken down and absorbed by the small intestine. This means they are badly digested and arrive in the large intestine, where they act as a food source for bacteria, soak up water and produce gas, leading to pain, bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation – classic IBS symptoms. The idea of removing FODMAP foods is to take away these carbs and sugars that your body has trouble digesting, and it’s been found to make a difference in 70 per cent of cases. [Stretches to improve digestion] FODMAP foods Fruits: Apples, apricots, avocados, blackberries, cherries, concentrated fruit juices, dates, dried fruits, figs, lychees, mango, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, prunes, tinned fruit in natural juices, watermelon. Alternative fruits: Banana, bilberries, blackcurrants, blueberries, cantaloupe/honeydew melon, cranberries, grapefruit, kiwi fruit, oranges, pineapple, strawberries, raspberries. Vegetables: Asparagus, beetroot, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, garlic, mushroom, onion, leeks, sweetcorn. Alternative vegetables: Carrots, celery, cucumber, lettuce, peas, peppers, olives, spinach, tomatoes, courgettes, parsnips, squashes, sweet potato. Pulses: Lentils, chickpeas, beans (including baked beans, kidney beans and soya beans) Cereals: Wheat, bulgar wheat, rye, barley Alternative cereals: Rice, oats, millet, polenta or quinoa. FODMAPs are found in many foods so get expert help before you cut them out [REX] Others to avoid: Milk products (switch to lactose free or avoid entirely, particularly if you have an intolerance show up in testing), sweeteners such as fructose, high fructose corn syrup, honey, xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol – instead try small amounts of sugar, golden or maple syrup. Saccharin and aspartame can also be tolerated.

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Should I Have Tests For Irritable Bowel Syndrome (ibs)?

Making hard work of bowel problems

The Equality Tribunal was told the nature of the woman’s illness meant that she needed to be able to access a toilet quickly ‘as she suffers from embarrassing symptoms associated with her medical condition’. Photograph: Getty Images

Many people have symptoms of IBS (such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating, or abdominal pain) and never see a doctor about them. Other people may choose to see a doctor because they are concerned about their symptoms or because the symptoms are affecting their life. The goal of managing IBS is to improve your quality of life by reducing the symptoms. However, even with good treatment, you may still have some symptoms. Doctors do not fully understand all the factors that may cause IBS. They know that IBS does not lead to other, more serious problems. However, some people may have both IBS and another digestive disorder. What can tests for other digestive system disorders show? In general, if you have IBS, all of your test results will be normal. If your symptoms match those of other people who have IBS, you and your doctor may feel confident about the diagnosis. The tests your doctor may do depend in part on your most bothersome symptoms. For example, diarrhea may be a symptom of infection with a parasite, such as giardiasis . If you have diarrhea, your doctor may do a stool analysis to check for this kind of problem. Or celiac disease may be the cause of your diarrhea. The doctor also may do a flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy to look at the mucous lining of the colon and may take a sample of the lining to check for inflammation (colitis).

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What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)?

She joined the HSE West in April 2001 and was diagnosed with IBS in 2004. She worked in an office next to a toilet but in July 2007 was transferred to another location where the toilet was more difficult to access. The Equality Tribunal was told the nature of the womans illness meant that she needed to be able to access a toilet quickly as she suffers from embarrassing symptoms associated with her medical condition. She was forced to go on sick leave rather than work in an office with three other staff which would cause her embarrassment and she believed her dignity at work would be compromised. Crosshead Equality officer Marian Duffy says she feels the womans HR manager did not take her medical problems seriously. She was eventually offered different posts outside the regional hospital where she worked, but Duffy says none of them amounted to a reasonable accommodation, given the nature of her illness. Duffy says she can not accept that an appropriate office could not be found for the woman given the size of the regional hospital she worked in and its budget. The woman took the case on the grounds of disability, one of nine allowed by the Equality Tribunal. The case has put the focus on the area of serious bowel conditions and their effects in the workplace on those who suffer from them. IBS is surprisingly common, affecting more than 10 per cent of people in various different forms, from mild to severe. Consultant gastroenterologist Dr Stephen Patchett says IBS is not so much a disease as a constellation of symptoms which includes pain, diarrhoea, constipation and heartburn. He says the typical IBS sufferer can expect to have the symptoms for three days in a row or three months in a row. The symptoms can be variable and two patients can have different experiences of IBS. It would be inappropriate for me to speak about this particular case, but, if you look at other jurisdictions where there have been cases such as this, like the US, it would be sensible for employers to take symptoms of IBS seriously, he says. The definition of a disability includes both mental and physical difficulties. Patients with IBS often suffer from anxiety and depression too.

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Editor’s Choice What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)? Patient / Public: 3 posts Irritable bowel syndrome, also known as IBS, spastic colitis, mucus colitis and nervous colon syndrome is a long-term (chronic) gastrointestinal disorder that causes abdominal pain, bloating, mucous in stools, irregular bowel habits, and alternating diarrhea and constipation . Although it is a chronic condition, symptoms tend to wax and wane over the years. Despite the chronic discomfort caused by IBS, it does not lead to any serious complications in the majority of patients. However, it can be a source of long-term pain, fatigue and some other symptoms, and contributes to work absenteeism. Fortunately, most patients find that symptoms improve as they become better at controlling their condition. Fortunately, only a small percentage of individuals with IBS have severe symptoms. IBS is regarded as a chronic illness that may have a considerably negative impact on the quality of life of the sufferer. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a diagnosis of exclusion (per exclusionem). In other words, a medical condition whose presence cannot be confirmed with complete confidence just by examination or testing. Diagnosis is therefore by elimination of other reasonable possibilities. There is no cure for IBS. Treatment is aimed at relieving symptoms, and includes dietary changes (avoiding caffeine, milk products, and sweeteners), relaxation techniques, medications and exercise. According to the National Health Service (NHS), UK, IBS is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions. Approximately 10% to 20% of the British population is affected by the condition at any one time.

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